Submission Deadlines:
Themed Categories – 29 July 2022
Open Categories & STEM Challenge – 30 September 2022

Conditions of Entry

TSTS 2022 is open to all Tasmanian students K-12.

All entries must be submitted via the www.stat.org.au website, following the required submission procedure.

 – There is no entry fee for TSTS 2022

STAT expects that work submitted to the TSTS is of a high standard. On rare occasions, where entries do not meet that standard, the judging committee reserves the right not to award prizes in a division.

If possible, students in Intermediate Secondary and Senior Secondary Divisions who submit entries for: Creative Writing, Scientific Essay, STEM Challenge, Research Investigations, Natural Sciences Project, and Invention/Engineering should pass their work through Turnitin and submit the report with their entry. with the summary report submitted with their entry. If students are not able to access Turnitin, judges reserve the right to submit a student’s entry for checking.

A Risk Assessment form is required for ALL Tasmanian Science Talent Search entries for the Open sections of the TSTS: Research Investigation, Environmental Science Project, Inventions & Engineering entry and the STEM Challenge if appropriate. A risk assessment form can be found at the end of this booklet.

Entries that do not follow the submission guidelines for their category will not be considered. Please read the entry guidelines and ‘what to do’ sections carefully.

For the Inventions & Engineering category, models and inventions may contain commercially available components such as switches, motors, meters etc, however entries must not have been solely assembled from, or based on commercially produced kits.

Safety Considerations

Students and their supervising teachers or parents should ensure that their science entries are conducted in a responsible and safe manner.

Projects involving microorganisms will only be accepted if adequate safety precautions are evident and the microorganisms present no threat to the health of individuals or the environment.

Projects involving hazardous chemicals, explosives, rocket fuels, detrimental to the environment, or potentially harmful to individuals will not be accepted.

All electrical experiments should not be in excess of 32 volts AC or 115 volts DC.

Projects involving illegal activities will not be accepted.

Electronic Submission Requirements

All entries should be submitted as PDFs EXCEPT in the video category where a weblink should be provided.

About the Tasmanian Science Talent Search

The Tasmanian Science Talent Search is an initiative of the Science Teachers Association of Tasmania. It has been operating continuously since 1960 (though not always by the same name) and has involved over 60,000 students since its inception.

Through the TSTS, we aim to:

  • Inspire a lifelong interest in science
  • Promote high quality teaching and learning
  • Highlight a Pathway to Excellence

The National Science Week 2022 school theme is Glass: More than Meets the Eye.

This year is also the United Nations International Year of Glass, celebrating the past, present and future of glass for a sustainable, equitable and better tomorrow!

Awards and Prizes

10 Categories will be judged across 6 divisions. All categories will be awarded a First Prize and Runner Up.

Merit awards will be awarded across the divisions and sections.

Categories

THEMED
– Picture Book
– Creative Writing
– Poster
– Photographic Essay – Video
– Scientific Essay
– STEM Challenge

OPEN
– Research Investigations
– Environmental Science Project
– Inventions & Engineering

Divisions

Please note not all divisions are eligible for all categories. See the category information for details.

Division 1: K – 2
Division 2: 3 – 4
Division 3: 5 – 6
Division 4: 7 – 8
Division 5: 9 – 10
Division 6: 11 – 12

Contact and Help

For all queries or questions please contact TSTS Coordinator Alana De Luca via tsts@stat.org.au

Picture Book

This category is open to divisions 1-3

Entry guidelines

  • Entries must be relevant to the topic
    Looking through a glass window and be
    a work of fiction.
  • Entrants may be individuals or small
    groups (of up to 3 students). Divisions 1
    and 2 may submit whole class entries.
  • Entries should include scientific
    concepts and information in the story.
  • Entries should consist primarily of
    pictures supported by minimal text.
  • An appendix including a brief
    explanation of 5 key science ideas
    used to develop the story should be
    included.
  • A bibliography listing all sources used
    to develop the entry should be included.
  • An acknowledgements statement
    listing any people who helped and what
    they did should be included in the
    submission.
  • Typed text is encouraged but not
    essential. Handwriting should be clear
    and legible if used.
  • Pictures can be created using any
    medium.
  • Downloaded images cannot exceed
    25% of total artwork and must be cited.
  • Word limits
  • Division 1: 200 words
  • Divisions 2 – 3: 300 words

Submission Deadline: 29 July 2022

What to do:

Decide on the 5 key science ideas you
want to cover in your entry.

  1. Create your picture book. Remember,
    artwork can be created using any
    medium and at least 75% should be
    original work. Handwriting is OK as
    long as it is clear and legible, but typed
    text is preferred.
  2. Add your appendix summarising the
    science ideas you used to develop your
    story.
  3. Add your bibliography and
    acknowledgments.
  4. Submit your picture book as an A4 or
    A3 PDF All entries must be submitted via
    the www.stat.org.au website, following
    the required submission procedure.

 

Resources and inspiration:

Exploring Picture Story Books
Writing Your Picture Story Book

Creative Writing

This category is open to ALL DIVISIONS

Entry guidelines

  • Entries must be relevant to the topic
    Glass: More than meets the Eye.
  • Only individual entries will be considered
    for this category.
  • Entries must be imaginative. This could
    mean a diary, letter, speech, cartoon,
    narrative, fable, poem, etc.
  • Entries should include at least 5 key
    science concepts, which should be
    listed in an appendix.
  • A bibliography listing all sources used
    to develop the entry should be included.
  • An acknowledgements statement
    listing any people who helped and what
    they did should be included in the
    submission.
  • Typed text is encouraged but not
    essential. Handwriting should be clear
    and legible if used.
  • Illustrations can be used to complement
    the writing or as an integral part of the
    text style. Any medium can be used.
  • Downloaded images cannot exceed
    25% of total artwork and must be cited.
  • Word limits
  • Division 1: 50 – 300 words
  • Division 2: 100 – 500 words
  • Divisions 3 – 6: 250 – 1000 words

Submission Deadline: 29 July 2022

What to do:

1. Decide on the 5 key science ideas you
want to cover in your entry.
2. Write your piece. Be creative!
3. Add your appendix listing each
scientific idea covered in your entry.
For Divisions 3 and above, this
should include a short (1 – 3
sentence) explanation of each
concept.
4. Add your bibliography and
acknowledgments.
5. Submit your entry as an A4 PDF. All
entries must be submitted via the
www.stat.org.au website, following the
required submission procedure.

Posters

This category is open to divisions 1-5

Entry guidelines

  • Entries must be relevant to the topic
    Glass: More than meets the Eye.
  • Only individual entries will be
    considered for this category.
  • Entries should be informed by
    personal research or be part of a
    learning sequence.
  • Entries should integrate understanding
    of scientific concepts with artistic
    skill and interpretation.
  • Information posters, diagrams,
    scientific charts, and pictorial essays
    will not be considered.
  • Posters may combine graphic and text
    elements.
  • Typed text is encouraged but not
    essential. Handwriting should be clear
    and legible if used.
  • Word limit: 20 words.

Submission Deadline: 29 July 2022

What to do: 

1. Decide on the topic for your poster.
Posters should advertise a science
concept, issue or idea in a way that is
eye-catching, informative and/or
challenges a person’s thinking.
2. Create your entry. Remember to limit
text to 20 words.
3. Submit your poster as an A3 PDF. All
entries must be submitted via the
www.stat.org.au website, following the
required submission procedure.

Photographic Essays

This category is open to divisions 2-6

Entry guidelines

  • Entries must be relevant to the topic
    Glass: More than meets the Eye.
  • Only individual entries will be
    considered for this category.
  • Entries should include a series of 6 – 8
    photographs that tell a story.
  • Photographs must be taken by the
    entrant for the purpose of this
    competition.
  • Photos may be edited by the entrant.
  • Each photograph may include a
    caption of up to 20 words.
  • Photographs can be arranged in any
    sequence.
  • No photograph can exceed 1 MB and
    entries must not exceed 8 MB in total.
  • Include a numbered list of all
    photographs in the order they appear
    and state what if any editing has been
    performed.
  • An artist’s statement of up to 200
    words, acknowledgments, and
    bibliography should be included in the
    entry.

Submission Deadline: 29 July 2022

What to do:

1. Take your photographs and edit them
if you would like to.
2. Create your title page. This should
include your project name, your
name, the division you are entering,
and your school’s name.
3. Add your photos (one per page) in
any order you like. Photos may be
accompanied by a caption (up to 20
words each).
4. Write your artist’s statement (no more
than 200 words).
5. Add your bibliography and
acknowledgments.
6. Submit your essay as an A4 PDF. All
entries must be submitted via the
www.stat.org.au website, following the
required submission procedure.

Videos

This category is open to ALL DIVISIONS

Entry guidelines

  • Entries must be relevant to the topic
    Glass: More than meets the Eye.
  • Entries may be submitted by
    individuals or by small groups of up to
    3 students. Divisions 1 and 2 may
    submit whole class entries.
  • Entrants may choose any topic related
    to the theme and any genre.
  • Videos should be informed by personal
    research or be part of a learning
    sequence.
  • Videos must be the work of the
    entrant. Any footage from other
    sources must make up less than 10%
    of the final video.
  • Only the entrant may work on the
    editing and postproduction of the
    video. Techniques taught by teachers
    etc must be done using unrelated
    footage.
  • Videos should be 90 seconds to 3
    minutes long not including credits.
  • Credits should include roles of
    entrants, bibliography,
    acknowledgments, and a list of
    equipment and software used.
  • Credits should be up to 30 seconds
    long.

Submission Deadline: 29 July 2022

What to do:

1. Choose the topic you wish to convey
in your video.
2. Write a script and plan your shoot.
Think about your use of sound, slow
motion, subtitles, animation, colour,
etc.
3. Film and edit your footage.
4. Include a credits section. Make sure
to add everyone involved and what
they did.
5. Upload your video to a video sharing
site like YouTube
6. Make sure your video can be viewed
by anyone with a link.
7. Submit your video by sharing a link to
your entry All entries must be
submitted via the www.stat.org.au
website, following the required
submission procedure.

Resources and inspiration

Sleek Geeks
MyState Filmmaking Guides

Scientific Essays

This category is open to DIVISIONS 4 – 6

Entry guidelines

  • Entries must be relevant to the topic
    Glass: More than meets the Eye.
  • Entrants may choose from one of the
    following topics for their scientific
    essays:

    1. Glass is the answer to saving
    our planet
    2. Glass is not sustainable
    3. The properties of glass are
    fundamental in forensic science
    4. Glass is still the doorway to our
    innovative future

  • Indicate the topic choice in the header of
    your entry.
  • Only individual entries will be considered
    for this category.
  • The essay must incorporate scientific
    information and evidence
  • Essays should follow conventions of
    persuasive writing.
  • References should be cited in-text and a
    bibliography included at the end of the
    essay.
  • Include An acknowledgements
    paragraph listing anyone who assisted
    with the essay and what they did.
  • Formatting: Times New Roman or Arial
    font, 12 pt., 1.5 line spacing, 2.5 cm
    margins.
  • Word limits
    • Division 4: 1200 words
    • Division 5: 1500 words
    • Division 6: 2000 words

Submission Deadline: 29 July 2022

What to do:

1. Choose the topic you wish to write
your essay on. Make sure it is clear
which you have chosen.
2. Plan your essay. Write a thesis
statement, do some background
reading, and plan your arguments.
3. Write your essay. You may want to
use images, tables, or graphs to
support your argument, but these
should be used sparingly.
4. Cite your sources in-text and include
a bibliography.
5. Add an acknowledgements paragraph
at the end of your essay including
anyone who helped develop your
essay including in the planning or
editing stages.
6. Submit your essay as a PDF. All
entries must be submitted via the
www.stat.org.au website, following the
required submission procedure.

Resources and inspiration

Persuasive Writing
Plagiarism & Referencing

STEM Challenge

This category is open to ALL DIVISIONS

Design an innovative solution to clear glass waste created by your school or
community, centred on reusing and repurposing glass containers in a creative way
OR
Explore how glass and other materials are used in buildings and create a design for a
new classroom using glass products.

Entry guidelines

  • Entries must be related to one of the
    two topics above.
  • Entries may be submitted by
    individuals or by small groups of up to
    3 students. Divisions 1 and 2 may
    submit whole class entries.
  • A bibliography should be included at
    the end of the report.
  • Reports may include photographs,
    drawings, schematics, and videos to
    support the text.

Submission Deadline: 30 September 2022

 

Suggested STEM process

  • What is the problem you could solve, or
    the research opportunity that you would
    investigate, if you could?
  • Find out more.
  • What have other people done
    previously?
  • What are the limitations or
    constraints?
  • What is your goal or the mission of
    your project?
    How can you solve the problem or
    conduct the research?
  • What would you do?
  • Tell us about your creative decisionmaking process.
  • What are some of the various ideas
    you considered?
  • Explain why you selected the
    approach you took and why other
    ideas were not chosen.

Plan a model

  • This doesn’t have to be a real working
    model, a design on paper is fine.
    Unless you really want to build, then
    great! Maybe it could be a computer
    aided design, or a coded animation.
  • If you are taking the research path,
    what equipment would you need? How
    would you conduct it? What would be
    your hypothesis?
  • Describe the engineering details; list
    the steps that would need to be taken
    and the materials needed, and how it
    will work.
  • Identify any safety issues and how you
    would lessen risk.

What to do:

1. Decide which challenge you want to
undertake.
2. Do some research. What are some
existing solutions to the problems?
Are there any issues with these?
3. Follow the suggested STEM process
on the next page.
4. Write up a report.
5. Submit your entry as an A4 PDF. All
entries must be submitted via the
www.stat.org.au website, following the
required submission procedure.

Resources and inspiration

Science Week

 

Test your model/research methodology
(even if it is not real) and reflect.

  • Imagine your model/research was
    real, what tests would you conduct to
    see if it works?
  • What are the strengths and
    weaknesses of your plan?
  • What modifications/refinements could
    you do to improve/adjust design?
  • What are future possibilities?
  • Record your steps with notes,
    diagrams, and/or photographs or
    video.

Research Investigations

This category is open to ALL DIVISIONS

Entry guidelines

  • This is an open section. Students
    plan, carry out and report on an
    experimental inquiry on a topic in
    which they have a personal interest, or
    is of community relevance.
  • Entries may be submitted by
    individuals or small groups of up to 3
    students. Divisions 1 and 2 may
    submit whole class entries.
  • An acknowledgments section listing all people who helped with the
    investigation and what they did must
    be included in the report.
  • Do not use standard school
    experiments. If based on a school
    experiment, it should offer a novel
    application, have some change, or use
    the method across a wider range of
    conditions.
  • Quantitative data is encourage but
    qualitative data will be accepted if
    analysed appropriately.
  • A risk assessment must be included
    with entries. Entries without a risk
    assessment included will not be
    considered for judging.
  • Formatting: Times New Roman or Arial
    font, 12 pt, 1.5 line spacing, 2.5 cm
    margins.

Submission Deadline: 30 September
2022

What to do:

1. Choose the topic you wish to
investigate.
2. Do some background research to
understand the main concepts
associated with your topic. Seek
expert knowledge from within your
community or the industry associated
with your topic.
3. Identify a problem or a knowledge
gap to address in your investigation.
4. Take some time to plan your
investigation and your experiments.
5. Perform your experiments! Keep a
detailed log book of your methods
and results. Make sure you note down
if anything goes wrong or was
unexpected.
6. Analyse your data and decide how
you want to display it. What kind of
graphs or tables will best show your
results?
7. Write up a report. Check out the
guides on the next few pages for
more information.
8. Submit your report as an A4 PDF. All
entries must be submitted via the
www.stat.org.au website, following the
required submission procedure.

    Resources and inspiration

    Controlled Experiments
    Variables
    SEIA
    Science Project Abastracts
    The Scientific Method
    Materials and Methods
    Prediction v Hypothesis
    Research Plan Resources

    Writing a Primary Research Investigation Report

    A Research Investigation showcases
    the entire process of planning,
    conducting, and reporting on a
    scientific experiment or inquiry.

    The report should include:

    Cover page – include a title, name, or
    names (if it is a group entry), school,
    year level and a relevant picture.
    Abstract – an 80–100-word overview of
    your project
    Introduction– this is where you explain
    why the topic was chosen. It could be a
    problem to solve or a question to answer.
    State what you already know and have
    discovered through research. Introduce
    terminology or vocabulary relevant to
    your topic, process, or the equipment
    you used.
    Aim – state the purpose of your
    experiment, what you hope to learn,
    discover, or find out.
    Prediction and/or Hypothesis –
    students must include one, the other or
    both. Students can have multiple
    predictions/hypotheses if more than one
    simple test is conducted as part of an
    investigation.
    Variables – these are the factors you
    change, control or measure/observe to
    determine if a causal relationship exists.
    Materials – make a detailed list of all
    equipment (e.g., 6 x 1L plastic tubs; 15g
    salt). Diagrams/photos can help show
    how you set up the equipment.
    Method – a clear, step-by-step
    description of what you did (past tense).
    Can include diagrams or photos.

    Risk Assessment – a focus on safety is
    important. Untrained teachers/parents
    might not model safe practices. Include a
    section on risk/safety.
    Results – include clearly labelled tables,
    graphs, charts, photos, diagrams, maps,
    observations etc.
    Discussion – As a minimum, this
    section should:

    • Describe patterns in the results
    • Explain patterns by suggesting the
      cause
    • Explain any errors/problems that
      occurred and what you did to fix them
    • Identify what could be done to
      discover more about the topic (i.e., the
      next point of learning)

    Conclusion – summarise what you did,
    the reason you did it and state the main
    outcomes/findings. Was the aim fulfilled?
    Was the prediction accurate? Was the
    hypothesis supported? Can you relate
    your findings to the real world?
    References and/or Bibliography –
    these record the sources used in your
    background research. By Upper Primary
    many students cite facts in-text.
    Acknowledgements – of people who
    gave input, advice, help, equipment and
    what they did. Did a teacher suggest the
    idea? Did a parent do some of the
    typing?
    Appendix – include logbooks, photo
    records, risk assessment and any other
    relevant information judges may need.

    Writing a Secondary Research Investigation Report

    A Research Investigation is an
    extended written task in which
    students show the entire process of
    planning, conducting, and reporting
    on a scientific experiment/inquiry. Top
    senior entries are Project-Based
    Learning or Depth Studies.

    The report should include:

    Cover page – include a title, name, or
    names (if it is a group entry), school,
    year level and a relevant picture.
    Abstract – an 80–150-word overview of
    your project
    Introduction – explain why you chose
    the topic, define terminology and explain
    the research you’ve done. This should be
    detailed and directly relevant. Cite
    sources in-text.
    Aim – state the purpose of your
    experiment, what you hope to learn,
    discover, or find out.
    Prediction and/or Hypothesis –
    students must include one, the other or
    both. Students can have multiple
    predictions/hypotheses if more than one
    simple test is conducted as part of an
    investigation.
    Variables – these are the factors you
    change, control or measure/observe to
    determine if a causal relationship exists.
    Materials – make a detailed list of all
    equipment (e.g., 6 x 1L plastic tubs; 15g
    salt). Diagrams/photos can help show
    how you set up the equipment.
    Method – a clear, step-by-step
    description of what you did (past tense).
    Can include diagrams or photos.

    Risk Assessment – a focus on safety is
    important. Include a risk assessment for
    and a section on risk/safety.
    Results – include clearly labelled tables,
    graphs, charts, photos, diagrams, maps,
    observations etc.
    Discussion – As a minimum, this
    section should:

    • Describe any patterns in your results
    • Explain the cause of any patterns in
      your results
    • Analyse the validity of your results by
      identifying any errors/problems in your
      experimental design
    • Evaluate the relevance, importance, or
      ‘real-world’ application of your findings
    • Identify extensions or new hypotheses
      that require future investigation.

    Conclusion – summarise what you did,
    the reason you did it and state the main
    outcomes/findings. Was the aim fulfilled?
    Was the prediction accurate? Was the
    hypothesis supported? Can you relate
    your findings to the real world?
    References and/or Bibliography –
    References are those sources you cite; a
    Bibliography records all sources used in
    research, experimental design etc.
    Acknowledgements – of people who
    gave input, advice, help, equipment and
    what they did. Did a teacher suggest the
    idea? Did a parent do some of the
    typing?
    Appendix – include logbooks, photo
    records, risk assessment and any other
    relevant information judges may need.

    Environmental Science Projects

    This category is open to DIVISIONS 4 – 6

    A Natural Sciences Project can be used to report on a ‘grass-roots’ initiative in agriculture, conservation, land management or related disciplines. Projects can be Case Studies of works completed by a school, local community citizen science group or partnership. Works currently ‘in progress’ are also appropriate.

    Entry guidelines

    • This is an open section. Students plan,
      carry out and report on an experimental
      inquiry on a topic in which they have a
      personal interest, or is of community
      relevance.
    • Entries may be submitted by individuals
      or small groups of up to 3 students
    • A Natural Sciences Project gives
      students the opportunity to showcase
      applied science. It differs from a
      Research Investigation because it is not
      focused on generating a hypothesis or
      controlling experimental variables:
    • Entries must showcase (a) results of an
      initiative completed in the last 3 years;
      or (b) the status of an initiative ‘in
      progress’.
    • Projects must be directly relevant to
      the entrant’s school or local community.
    • The Project must incorporate scientific
      information and evidence from
      research.
    • A bibliography listing all resources used
      must be included.
    • An Acknowledgements page identifying
      people who worked on the initiative
      must be included.
    • Formatting: Times New Roman or Arial
      font, 12 pt, 1.5 line spacing, 2.5 cm
      margins.
    • Word limit: 1500 – 3000 words

    Submission Deadline: 30 September
    2022

      What to do:
      1. Choose a problem or challenge you
      wish to address in your project. Make
      sure to clearly outline what this problem
      is in your background.
      2. Do some background research on your
      chosen topic. Seek expert knowledge
      from within your community or the
      industry associated with your topic.
      3. Write up a comprehensive background
      section summarising your research and
      your project aims.
      4. Include a section that addresses the
      methods, interventions, or strategies
      you will use to address your problem.
      5. Present your observations and results.
      Use measurements where possible.
      You can display your results however
      you like, as tables, graphs, photos,
      interview, maps, etc.
      6. Write your discussion section. This
      should describe the outcomes of your
      work, analyse what was and was not
      successful, identify errors or problems
      you encountered, and suggest possible
      improvements or future work that
      needs to be done.
      7. Submit your report as an A4 PDF. All
      entries must be submitted via the
      www.stat.org.au website, following the
      required submission procedure.

      Engineering Inventions

      This category is open to DIVISIONS 3 – 6

      Entry guidelines

      • This is an open section. Students plan,
        carry out and report on an experimental
        inquiry on a topic in which they have a
        personal interest, or is of community
        relevance.
      • Entries may be submitted by individuals
        or small groups of up to 3 students.
      • Using an Engineering Design Process,
        students identify a problem then create,
        test, and refine a working invention.
      • An invention may be a completely new
        idea or a significant refinement of an
        existing device. A method or process
        can be an invention.
      • An entry must be a working invention
        that solves a real problem. ICT-based
        projects in an Engineering or Science
        context are also eligible.
      • Entries must apply scientific principles
        and show research into similar or rival
        inventions or devices.
      • Entries must be well manufactured.
      • A bibliography listing all resources used
        must be included.
      • An Acknowledgements page identifying
        people who worked on the initiative
        must be included.
      • Entries must include a risk assessment
        to be considered.
      • Both a logbook, video, and report must
        be submitted for an entry to be eligible.
      • Formatting: Times New Roman or Arial
        font, 12 pt, 1.5 line spacing, 2.5 cm
        margins.
      • Word limit: 800 – 3000 words

      Submission Deadline: 30 September
      2022

        What to do:
        1. Choose a problem.
        2. Design a device or product to solve the
        problem or offer a different approach to
        the problem.
        3. Write up your report. Reports should
        include:

        Aim – the goal of your invention
        Introduction – explains the problem you
        identified, limitations of existing solutions
        and what is new about your invention.
        Design Brief – how you built, tested &
        refined your invention.
        Discussion – explains scientific principles
        that apply to your invention. Analyses the
        results of tests. Describes limitations and
        proposes further improvements.
        References & Bibliography – provides a
        record of your background research.
        Acknowledgements – of people who gave
        advice, help, equipment and what they did.
        Appendix – Logbook, risk management,
        link to video of your invention in operation
        etc.
        Video – Video the invention in operation.
        Video quality is not assessed, but judges
        need to see and hear the invention
        working to judge it.

        4. Submit your report as an A4 PDF. All
        entries must be submitted via the
        www.stat.org.au website, following the
        required submission procedure.
        Resources and inspiration
        Engineering Design Process